EVERYTHING ABOUT

EASTERN MEDICINE

Every week I am posting about  everything you need to know about hormones. This weeks topic is eastern medicine.

Did you know – eastern medicine

  • Also known as Oriental medicine refers to a range of medical practices that originated throughout Asia
  • Dates back thousands of years
  • Modern “Western Medicine” is only a couple of hundred years old
  • Yet modern science categorize these as alternative or complementary medicines
  • Such as:

– Traditional Chinese medicine / TCM – the oldest organized system of medicine in the world, and the mainstream form of medical therapy in China for over 2,000 years

– The first historical record of TCM was the Yellow Emperor’s Inner Canon, written around 150 BC

– Traditional Indian Medicine / TIM – also called Ayurveda is also one of the world’s oldest medical systems

  • The basic philosophy of Eastern medicine is to treat the whole person – encouraging a healthy body to prevent illness and or speed recovery
  • Both TIM and TCM break up the physical world into 5 elements

– Water, fire and earth in both TCM & TIM

– Ether and air in TIM / Ayurveda

– Metal and wood in TCM

  • Both philosophies believe in balancing the body and mind through relative forces

– TCM balances yin and yang — the opposite forces, masculine vs. feminine, doing vs. being

– TIM / Ayurveda balances the 3 Doshas, Vata, Kapha and Pitta

  • Modern science would say there is no evidence for the basic principles of TCM and TIM/Ayurveda, such as qi / chi or prana and proclaim that much of Eastern medicine is based on subjective interpretation of ancient dogma.
  • BUT with that said increased side effects, lack of curative treatment for several chronic diseases, high cost of new drugs, microbial resistance and emerging diseases are some reasons for renewed public interest in complementary and alternative Eastern medicines.

Meet Sally and get to know all about eastern medicine

Intro

Chakras 1010

Meridians 101

DIY Hand acupressure

Understanding Qi & Prana – Life Force Energy

  • Qi / Prana is generally defined as the vital energy that flows through the bodies of every living thing.
  • The literal translation from Chinese characters means “moulded by the energy of the nature”.
  • The Chinese believe that Qi permeates everything and link their bodies’ to the surrounding environment.
  • Qi vital energy circulates through the body in pathways referred to as meridians.
  • Prana vital energy circulates through the Chakras.
  • Symptoms or illnesses are believed to be the result of blocked, disrupted, or unbalanced Qi / Prana moving through the meridians or Chakras.
  • A properly flowing Qi / Prana is believed to be responsible for many aspects of health.
  • Thus, a major focus of TCM and TIM practices is often targeted at unblocking and allowing the Qi / Prana to properly circulate throughout the body.

 

TIM – 1 type of Prana

  • Vata – related to the guiding intelligence behind all our physiological and psychological functions.

 

TCM – 4 Types of Qi

  • Inborn Qi – related to genetics and cellular makeup
  • Pectoral Qi – related to metabolism, including external factors like air and food
  • Nutritive Qi – related to diet and other nutritive factors
  • Protective Qi – related to protection from the outside world aka immune health

The various Qi are interdependent and interconnected networks essential for optimal health.

The concept has been recently embraced by Western medical science called systems biology.

 

Systems Biology / Functional Medicine

  • is the study of complex biological systems and the networks that connect them.
  • these connections can be through

– Nerve conduction

– Hormones

– Signalling molecules

– Electrical impulses

– External cues like day and night

  • Also the understanding that a single input, such as diet, exercise, medicines, stress etc. does not just affect one cell, or one organ, or even one biological system.
  • Rather, an input can have very wide-reaching effects on our physiology, affecting

– Mental health

– Emotions

– Internal organ function

– Sensory organ function

– Heart health

– Skeletal and connective tissue

– Body fluids

– Aging

  • A concept that has been appreciated by TCM & TIM for 1000’s of years 😊

Traditional Indian Medicine TIM / Ayurveda 101

The word “Ayurveda” is Sanskrit, meaning ‘knowledge of life and longevity’.

TIM is based on the philosophy that:

  • The human body is composed of 7 types of tissues – dhatus:

– Plasma – rasa

– Blood – rakta

– Muscles – māmsa

– Fat – meda

– Bone – asthi

– Marrow – majja

– Semen – shukra

– Waste – malas

– Biomaterials – doshas

  • The body substance is divided into five classical elements

– Earth

– Water

– Fire

– Air

– Ether

  • Has 20 qualities or characteristics, called Gunas – organized in 10 pairs

– heavy/light

– cold/hot

– unctuous/dry

– dull/sharp

– stable/mobile

– soft/hard

– non-slimy/slimy

– smooth/coarse

– minute/gross

– viscous/liquid

  • 3 elemental doshas

– Vata – space or air – which equates with the nervous system

– Pitta – fire – which equates with enzymes

– Kapha – earth and water – which equates with mucus

  • 3 Mental doshas which control the mind

– Satogun

– Rajogun

– Tamogun

  • Imbalance among the bodily and mental doshas is considered the major component of disease
  • Ayurveda uses 8 ways to diagnose illness

– Pulse – Nadi

– Urine – Mootra

– Stool – Mala

– Tongue – Jihva

– Speech – Shabda

– Touch – Sparsha

– Vision – Druk

– Appearance – Aakruti

  • TIM treatments can include:

– Plant-based medicines – derived from roots, leaves, fruits, bark, or seeds such as cardamom and cinnamon

– Animal based medicines – derived from milk, bones, and gallstones, fats both for consumption and for external use

– Minerals – including sulphur, arsenic, lead, copper sulfate and gold.

– Alcoholic beverages – Madya in Sanskrit, which are said to adjust the doshas, increasing Pitta and reducing Vatta and Kapha.

– Purified Opium – to balance the Vata and Kapha doshas and increase the Pitta dosha.

– Cannabis – an ingredient in Bhang (edible mixture made from the buds, leaves, and flowers of the female cannabis) to decrease nausea, vomiting, and physical pain

  • Massage techniques: Abhyanga – self massage and Garshana – body brushing.

Chakra 101

  • Chakras are a complex and ancient energy system that originated in India.
  • First mentioned in the Vedas, the sacred texts of spiritual knowledge dating from 1500 to 1000 BC.
  • Chakra (cakra in Sanskrit) means “wheel” and refers to energy points in your body.
  • Thought to be spinning disks of energy that should stay “open” and aligned
  • They correspond to bundles of nerves, major organs, and areas of our energetic body that affect our emotional and physical well-being.
  • In the Ayurvedic tradition, ‘chakra’ refers to the core energy centres within our body
  • Some say there are 114 different chakras, but there are 7 main chakras that run along your spine.
  • Located along the backbone and stretching from the base of the spine to the crown of the head
  • Each of these 7 main chakras has a corresponding number, name, colour, sound, and health focus and a physical, emotional, creative and spiritual component.
  • The chakras also interact with the body through the endocrine and nervous systems
  • Prana is ‘pushed’ through the body vis the Chakras to ensure health and vitality.
  • Chakras need to be balanced and nurtured – see how in the article ‘Meet the Chakras’ and ‘Tools to Balance Your Chakras’

Meet the Chakras

  • ROOT CHAKRA

– Sanskrit name – Muladhara – root centre

– Colour – red

– Located – at the base of the spine – pelvic floor, perineum / cervix

– Related to – the Adrenal glands

– Special characteristics – a sense of belonging, and survival and safety

– Controls – basic needs for safety and survival. It is also where your kundalini energy resides.

  • A blocked root chakra

– physical issues like arthritis, constipation, and bladder or colon problems

– emotionally issues like feeling insecure about finances or our basic needs and well-being.

  • An open root chakra

– we will feel grounded and secure, both physically and emotionally.

  • Balance the root chakra

– grounding

– connect with the earth physically – go outside and walk mindfully

– experience each time your foot hits the ground and visualize your connection to it.

 

  • SACRAL CHAKRA

– Sanskrit name – Swadhisthana

– Colour – orange

– Located – inside the pelvis

– Related to – the Ovaries and Testicles

– Special characteristics – emotion, creativity and sensuality.

– Controls – creativity and pleasure

  • A blocked sacral chakra

– Physical issues like urinary tract infections, lower back pain, and impotency.

– Emotional issues like feelings of low self-worth, and even more specifically, our self-worth around pleasure, sexuality, and creativity. You may become unemotional and closed

  • An open sacral chakra

– We enjoy sex and feel sensual

  • Balance the sacral chakra

– Spend time near a body of water, such as taking a bath or shower

– Yoga poses such as wide angle or bound angle pose to open the hips

 

  • SOLAR PLEXUS CHAKRA

– Sanskrit name – Manipura

– Colour – yellow

– Located – in the naval area

– Special characteristics – self-esteem, personal power, courage and self-will

– Controls –power and confidence, responsible for your personal and professional success, governs digestion and food metabolism.

  • A blocked solar plexus chakra

– Physical issues like digestive issues , ulcers, heartburn, eating disorders, and indigestion. related to our self-esteem and self-confidence.

– Emotional issues like feelings of low self-esteem and self-confidence, feeling insecure and anxious

  • An open solar plexus chakra

– We feel confident.

  • Balance the solar plexus chakra

– Increase core strength

– Yoga warrior pose for a few minutes every morning

– Spend time in the sun, such as meditating or yoga outside or going for a walk in the sunshine will do the trick.

 

  • HEART CHAKRA

– Sanskrit name – Anahata

– Colour – green

– Located – in the heart area

– Related to – the Thymus gland

– Special characteristics – healing, love and compassion

– Controls – love, openness, empathy and acceptance

  • A blocked heart chakra

– physical issues like heart problems – heart attacks, lung problems – asthma, immune problems, such autoimmune and weight issues.

– emotionally issues like putting others first, to our own detriment, inability to love and connect to others making us feel lonely, insecure, and isolated.

  • An open heart chakra

– we will feel loved and loving

  • Balance the heart chakra

– Forgive those who may have hurt you.

– Let go of past hurt, anger or grief.

– Yoga camel pose

 

  • THROAT CHAKRA

– Sanskrit name – Vishuddhi

– Colour – blue

– Located – in the throat area

– Related to – the thyroid gland

– Special characteristics – self-expression and communication.

– Controls – our voice and communicating our truth to the world around us, also related to listening and expression of the self.

  • A blocked throat chakra

– physical issues like voice and throat problems, teeth, gums, and mouth problems, Thyroid problems

– emotionally issues like dominating conversations, gossiping, speaking without thinking, trouble speaking your mind.

  • An open throat chakra

– we speak and listen with compassion, feel confident when we speak because we know we are being true to self.

  • Balance the throat chakra

– complete honesty, with others and with yourself is needed

– get all of your feelings out by keeping a journal to write down your feelings with complete honesty

– Sing your heart out as singing works the vocal muscles and activates the chakra.

 

  • THIRD EYE CHAKRA

– Sanskrit name – Ajna

– Colour – indigo

– Located – between the eyebrows

– Related to – the pituitary gland

– Special characteristic – intuition.

– Controls – development of intuition, higher truth and

  • A blocked third eye chakra

– physical issues like headaches, issues with sight, concentration, sinus and hearing problems.

– emotional issues like trouble listening to reality, “know it all syndrome”, struggle to have faith in the broader purpose, leading to feelings of insignificance and the inability to make decisions

  • An open third eye chakra

– we follow our intuition and are able to see the big picture.

  • Balance the third eye chakra

– Daily affirmations to target limiting beliefs, such as “I live every day in accordance with my life’s purpose.”

– Yoga childs pose and eagle pose

 

  • CROWN CHAKRA

– Sanskrit name – Sahasrara

– Colour – violet

– Located – top of the head

– Related to – the pineal gland

– Special characteristics – divine awareness and spirituality.

– Controls – the joining of consciousness and matter, connecting self to the supreme soul, our connection to spirituality

  • A blocked crown chakra

– physical issues can be any as the crown chakra is linked with every other chakra.

– emotional issues like narrow-minded, sceptical, or stubborn, disconnected from the spiritual side of life, may feel a strong attachment to material possessions or achievements.

  • An open crown chakra

– all the other chakras are open and we are enlightened

  • Balance the crown chakra

– Meditation, visualising clear white halo illuminating the entire crown of your head

– Chanting the sound of the crown chakra ‘Om’ creating a vibration through your body connecting you to the universe.

Tools to Balance Your Chakras

Meditation

  • Very effective way to balance the chakras.
  • Each chakra is associated with a sound, or bija mantra and a colour.
  • Focus on the qualities each particular chakra.

Yoga

  • Each chakra has certain yoga postures that help to balance it.
  • Generally related to the part of the body that the chakra is associated
  • During the postures, visualize the colours that correspond to the different chakras

Breathwork / Pranayama

  • The best pranayama for balancing is Nadi Shodhana, or alternate nostril breathing.
  • Block one nostril at a time and take deep breaths in and out.
  • Make sure to do the same number of breaths on each side.
  • This balances the nadis and brings the left and right hemispheres of the brain together.

Crystals

  • Crystals hold special energy
  • Each chakra has a crystals associated with it
  • Root chakra: hematite, garnet, obsidian
  • Sacral chakra: carnelian, amber, topaz
  • Solar plexus chakra: citrine, jasper, tiger’s eye
  • Heart chakra: rose quartz, amazonite, malachite
  • Throat chakra: turquoise, aquamarine
  • Third eye chakra: amethyst, lapis lazuli
  • Crown chakra: clear quartz, moonstone
  • Choose the crystal that corresponds to the chakra you want to focus on.
  • You can also choose one of each for total chakra balancing.
  • Place the crystals near you or directly on the chakra while you are meditating to enhance the energy of the crystal.

Essential Oils

  • As with crystals, there are different oils that correspond to different chakras.
  • The oils can be used by simply breathing them in or applying them topically.
  • Root chakra: Tea Tree, Patchouli
  • Sacral chakra: Clary Sage, Sandalwood, Passion Fruit
  • Solar plexus chakra: Lemon, Jasmine, Orange
  • Heart chakra: Eucalyptus, Damas Rose, Peach
  • Throat chakra: Peppermint, Cedar, Apple
  • Third eye chakra: Frankincense, Vanilla, Anis
  • Crown chakra: Lavender, Ylang Ylang, Bergamot
  • Choose the oils that corresponds to the chakra you want to focus on.

Massage

  • Abhyanga + Shirodhara which involves a hot oil massage and 2 litres of specifically formulated herbal oil being poured over the forehead and ‘third eye’ in a constant, gentle stream which helps to restore the ready flow of energy.

Meet the 3 Doshas

Vata

  • consists mostly of the two elements air and space aka ether
  • generally described as cold, light, dry, rough, flowing, and spacious.
  • Autumn represents vata for its cool, crisp days.

Kapha

  • Pronounced “kuffa” is based on earth and water.
  • Described as steady, stable, heavy, slow, cold, and soft.
  • Spring represents kapha for the slow exiting of hibernation.

Pitta

  • based on fire and water associated with a tenacious personality.
  • commonly described as hot, light, sharp, oily, liquid, and mobile.
  • Summer represents pitta for its sunny, hot days.

The 3 Doshas Personalities

Vata types

  • slim, energetic, and highly creative
  • known for thinking outside the box
  • can become easily distracted
  • mood is affected by the weather, people around them, and foods they eat
  • learn quickly, multitasker
  • kind-hearted, flexible
  • always “on the go”
  • forgetful
  • anxious
  • unstable mood
  • can get overwhelmed easily
  • highly sensitive to the cold
  • has trouble sleeping
  • irregular appetite and eating patterns
  • prone to digestive issues
  • poor circulation (cold hands and feet).

 

Kapha types 

  • strong, thick-boned, and caring
  • keeping things together
  • being a support system for others
  • rarely get upset
  • think before acting
  • go through life in a slow deliberate manner
  • empathetic
  • caring
  • trusting
  • patient
  • calm
  • wise
  • happy
  • romantic
  • strong bones and joints
  • healthy immune system
  • prone to weight gain
  • slow metabolism
  • sluggishness
  • over-sleeping
  • breathing issues i.e., asthma, allergies)
  • higher risk of heart disease
  • mucus build-up
  • susceptible to depression
  • needs regular motivation and encouragement.

 

Pitta types

  • usually of muscular build, very athletic, and serve as strong leaders
  • highly motivated
  • goal-oriented
  • the aggressive and tenacious nature can be off-putting to some people, which can lead to conflict
  • intelligent
  • purposeful
  • learn quickly
  • self-determined
  • masters skills easily
  • strong desire for success
  • strong, natural leaders
  • quick metabolism
  • good circulation
  • healthy skin and hair
  • impatient
  • prone to conflict
  • always hungry
  • mood swings when hungry
  • prone to acne and inflammation
  • sensitive to hot temperatures.

These are simple caricatures of the personality types. As with western astrology zodiac signs, when applied to actual people, they become much more complex and nuanced.

In reality we all have bits and pieces of each within us.

Traditional Chinese medicine / TCM 101

  • Dates back more than 2,500 years
  • Has evolved and been perfected ever since
  • Is one of the world’s oldest forms of medicine
  • Many of TCM’s principles and wisdom are being integrated into holistic strategies for health today
  • Yin and yang is the basis of TCM.
  • With the basic concept that a vital life force, called Qi / Chi, surges through the body
  • Any imbalance to this Qi can cause disease and illness.
  • The imbalances are most commonly thought to be caused by an alteration in the opposite and complementary forces that make up the Qi called yin and yang.
  • The ancient Chinese believed that humans are micro-cosmos of the larger surrounding universal cosmos and are interconnected with nature and subject to its forces.
  • Balance between the internal body organs and the external elements of earth, fire, water, wood, and metal must be mastered – The 5 element theory
  • The 5 element theory is the understanding that each individual is a blend of these elements, and in order to be truly healthy, they need to be balanced.
  • At the core of TCM is the corrective, preventative approach, actions to be taken before disease manifests.
  • It is typical to visit a TCM doctor before every change in season to take the actions necessary to support the approaching season, its respective element and organ. Actions could be herbal teas, animal part, specific Qi Gong movement, etc
  • TCM practitioners often spend more time conducting patient intake than a doctor in a conventional setting.
  • TCM uses the following to evaluate health:

– diagnostic imagery

– medical history

– mental and emotional health

– pulse

– tongue

  • The pulse and tongue are like two internal GPS, conveying the current state of health and balance within the system.
  • By treating the root cause of dysfunction, the symptoms are naturally resolved and health is restored
  • Much like Functional Medicine
  • TCM treatments to move Qi can include:

– Acupuncture – placing fine needles in specific points on the meridians

– Moxibustion – burning herbal leaves on or near the body

– Cupping – using warmed glass jars to create suction on certain points of the body

– Chinese Herbal medicines – derived from roots, leaves, fruits, bark, or seeds such as cardamom and cinnamon

– Animal Based medicines – derived from animal body parts, such as blood and bile, crushed bones and horn

– Oriental Nutrition & Diet Therapy – special soups and tea

– Oriental Bodywork and Massage techniques – Acupressure – pressure to specific meridian points, GuaSha- scrubbing the fever to the surface, Tui na

– Movement -Tai Chi and Qi Gong – coordinated movement and awareness, rhythmic breathing, and meditative states used for exercise, healing, and training for martial arts.

– Feng Shui – harmonizing energy in the placement and arrangement of physical objects in a space – said to affect health, wealth, and vigour of the occupants.

  • Science is warming up

– “From ancient archives to the Nobel Prize to a formal endorsement by the World Health Organization as a global healthcare system, TCM has widened the lens of modern science. It offers the wisdom and experience of millennia to inspire the think tank of today’s medicine and pharmacology and tomorrow’s generations of integrative healthcare advancements”.

Meridians 101

  • Meridians are pathways in which energy can travels through the body.
  • Just like blood vessels carry blood, nerves carry electrical and sensory information, meridians carry energy.
  • Meridians make up a network called the meridian system.
  • Each meridian, pathway or channel transports vital energy that Eastern medicine refers to as qi.
  • Meridians are also responsible for circulating your blood and fluids.
  • Energy line map the entire body running all the way from the base of the feet to the crown of the head or from the crown of the head to the base of the feet.
  • 12 major meridians that run on each side of the body, one side mirroring the other.
  • Every meridian line in the body corresponds to a specific set of organs.
  • These energy lines or meridians transmit information from the organs to the rest of the system and like little energy giving pathways they communicate and coordinate the body keeping it balanced and regulating in all its natural functions.
  • Think of the 12 main meridians as highways that extend all across your body and are intersected by smaller roads that connect to other major highways.
  • These smaller roads are also meridian channels called:

– “divergent channels”

– “extraordinary vessels”

– “sinew channels”.

  • Meridians generally have two key functions:

– act as Qi energy reservoirs

– circulate Qi keeping organs functioning

  • There are approx. 72 meridians, that must be maintained in good working order, to prevent Qi from stagnating to keep the body healthy.
  • On these pathways, over 350 points, acupressure points or acupuncture points are identified where the Qi can be accessed.
  • See the articles ‘Meet the Meridians’ and ‘TCM treatments for moving Qi and balancing yin & Yang’ for more information.

Meet the Meridians

Meridians were first mapped in the human body around 3,500 years’ ago by Chinese physicians

They understood that some sort of subtle energy was flowing around the body

When this energy flowed correctly, the person stayed healthy. When the energy was stuck, stagnant, weak or blocked in some way, the person would get sick.

The 12 Main Meridians and 2 Central Channels

  • Lung
  • Large Intestine
  • Stomach
  • Spleen
  • Heart
  • Small Intestine
  • Bladder
  • Kidney
  • Pericardium
  • Triple Heater (San Jiao)
  • Gallbladder
  • Liver
  • the Ren (Conception)
  • the Du (Governing)

Meridians that travel on your arms

  • Lung meridian
  • Pericardium meridian
  • Heart meridian
  • Large intestine meridian
  • Triple burner meridian
  • Small intestine meridian

Meridians that travel on your legs

  • Stomach meridian
  • Gallbladder meridian
  • Bladder meridian
  • Spleen meridian
  • Liver meridian
  • Kidney meridian

The Yin & Yang Pairs

  • Lung & Large Intestine
  • Spleen/Pancreas & Stomach
  • Herat & Small Intestine
  • Kidney & Bladder
  • Pericardium & Triple Heater
  • Liver & Gall Bladder

 

Disease States & Symptoms Associated with Meridian Imbalances

Stomach Meridian

  • Acid indigestion/reflux
  • Allergies
  • Bags under the eyes
  • Bloating and gas
  • Digestion issues
  • Hunger
  • Lip and mouth sores
  • Neck pain
  • Nervous tension
  • Ovary issues
  • Sinusitis
  • Sore throat
  • Stomach aches
  • Stomach ulcers
  • Tender breasts
  • Weight problems

Spleen Meridian

  • Allergies
  • Anemia
  • Anything to do with the blood
  • Carpal tunnel syndrome
  • Cysts
  • Diabetes
  • Edema (swelling)
  • Fertility / pregnancy isues
  • Hypoglycemia
  • Immunodeficiency issues
  • Infections
  • Lymph nodes
  • Varicose veins
  • Weakness
  • Weight issues

Heart Meridian:

  • Angina
  • Arteries
  • Bleeding gums
  • Blood pressure issues (high or low)
  • Chest pains
  • Circulation issues
  • Dizziness
  • Eczema
  • Heart issues
  • Sleep issues
  • Swollen glands

Small Intestine Meridian 

  • Abdominal issues or pain
  • Beer bellies
  • Knee pain
  • Shoulder pain
  • Tinnitus / ear problems
  • Weakness in legs

Bladder Meridian

  • Ankle pain / weakness
  • Arthritis
  • Baldness
  • Back pain (general)
  • Calf pain
  • Elbow issues
  • Fallen arches / flat feet
  • Headaches (at the front of the head)
  • Joint pain
  • Nervous system issues
  • Osteoporosis
  • Sciatica
  • Scoliosis
  • Brain issues

Kidney Meridian

  • Acne
  • Bone weakness/ issues
  • Back pain (lower back)
  • Ear issues / ear aches
  • Oedema
  • Eyesight
  • Infertility/impotence
  • Low libido
  • Prostate issues
  • Swollen ankles
  • Tooth / gum issues

Pericardium Meridian

  • Hormone issues
  • Impotence
  • Prostate issues
  • Sacrum issues
  • Sexual issues
  • Sore breasts, nipples or buttocks

Triple Warmer Meridian

  • Adrenal exhaustion or burn-out
  • Allergies
  • Asthma
  • Diabetes
  • Fever
  • Hives
  • Hormonal issues
  • Hypoglycemia
  • Menopause
  • Mood swings
  • PMS issues
  • Temperate issues (too hot, too cold)
  • Weight issues

 

Liver Meridian

  • Blurry vision
  • Candida
  • Eye infections/diseases
  • Fungal diseases
  • Hepatitis
  • Hypertension
  • Jaundice
  • Low sperm count
  • Menopause
  • PMS issues
  • Toenail problems (thick / yellow)
  • Toxicity

Gall Bladder Meridian

  • Arthritis
  • Bitter taste in the mouth
  • Blood pressure (too high)
  • Gallstones
  • Hip pain or issues
  • Jaw pain (TMJ)
  • Leg pain (sides of legs)
  • Migraine headaches
  • One sided issues (including headaches)
  • Shingles
  • Teeth grinding

Lung Meridian

  • Bronchitis
  • Chest infections
  • Colds
  • Coughs
  • Flu
  • Pleurisy
  • Pneumonia
  • Shortness of breath
  • Respiratory issues
  • Skin issues
  • Tuberculosis

Large Intestine Meridian

  • Colic pain
  • Colonic issues
  • Constipation; Haemorrhoids
  • Diarrhoea
  • Herpes
  • Hip problems
  • Mineral deficiency
  • Nose issues
  • Toothache

Du – Governing Meridian:

  • Spinal problems
  • Mental clarity issues
  • Mental disorders
  • Fever 
  • Nose issues
  • Headaches
  • Brain related illnesses

Ren – Conception Meridian

  • Diseases of the urogenital system
  • Hernia
  • Cough
  • Breathing difficulties
  • Breast problems

 

Yin & Yang 101

The concept that opposing forces are actually complimentary, essential, and need to exist in balance and harmony for optimal health. You can’t have one without the other, such as:

  • light and dark
  • positive and negative
  • fire and water
  • good and evil
  • male and female
  • expanding and contracting

 

Yin and Yang Energy Traits

Yin Energy

  • feminine
  • passive
  • cold
  • dark
  • negative
  • inward
  • soft
  • down
  • back
  • water
  • evil
  • expanding

Yang Energy

  • masculine
  • active
  • hot
  • light
  • positive
  • outward
  • hard
  • up
  • front
  • fire
  • good
  • contracting.

Tools to Move Qi and Balance Yin & Yang

Acupuncture
placing fine needles in specific points on the meridians

Moxibustion
– burning herbal leaves on or near the body

Cupping
– using warmed glass jars to create suction on certain points of the body

Chinese Herbal medicines – derived from roots, leaves, fruits, bark, or seeds such as cardamom and cinnamon

Animal Based medicines
– derived from animal body parts, such as blood and bile, crushed bones and horn

Oriental Nutrition & Diet Therapy
– special soups and tea

Oriental Bodywork and Massage techniques
– Acupressure – pressure to specific meridian points, GuaSha- scrubbing the fever to the surface, Tui na

Movement
-Tai Chi and Qi Gong – coordinated movement and awareness, rhythmic breathing, and meditative states used for exercise, healing, and training for martial arts

Feng Shui
– harmonizing energy in the placement and arrangement of physical objects in a space – said to affect health, wealth, and vigour of the occupants.

DIY Hand Acupressure

  • Applying pressure to Acupressure points can
  • help relieve pain
  • establish balance
  • improve health throughout the body


Spirit Gate – Heart 7

Found in the crease of your wrist. It lies in line with the space between your ring and pinkie finger.

Applying gentle pressure to this spot may protect against anxiety, insomnia, heart palpitations, and depression.

 

Back Ravine – Small Intestine 3

Located at the outside part of your hand, right on the edge. The point lies in the depression of your hand just below your little finger.

Applying firm pressure on this point may relieve neck pain, earaches, and headaches that occur at the back of your head.

 

Lung Meridian from 9 – 11

Located at the edge of your thumb running from the tip down along the side of your hand, ending just beneath the crease of your wrist.

Run your finger along this line and applying gentle pressure on any sore spots may help relieve any cold symptoms, such as chills, sneezing, runny nose, and sore throat.


Inner Gate Point – Pericardium – 6

Located in a special spot on the 3 cm or 3 fingers from the crease of your wrist.

Applying firm pressure with your thumb may improve your digestion and relieve any nausea or stomach pain.

 

Outer Gate Point- Triple Warmer – 5

Located between two tendons on the backside of the wrist 3 fingers from the crease of the wrist.

Apply firm pressure can give your immune system a quick boost even a rush of energy.

 

Yang Valley – Small Intestine – 5

Locate by running a finger down your little finger to your wrist crease, in line with your little finger to the small indentation

Applying firm pressure may help promote mental clarity and calmness.

 

Great Abyss – Lung – 9

Locate by running a finger down your thumb, to your wrist crease at the base of your thumb.

Applying gentle pressure and massaging this point with your finger may help alleviate respiratory and breathing problems.

 

Hand Valley Point – Large Intestine – 4

Located in the firm skin between the thumb and index finger. Applying a firm touch to this pressure point may help reduce stress, as well as alleviate migraines, toothaches, shoulder tension, and neck pain.

Meet the elements

  • WOOD a time of growth – think

– Season – Spring

– Body part – Liver and gallbladder

– Sensory Organ – Eyes

– Tissue Tendons

– Fluid – Tears

– Colour – Green

– Emotion: Anger

– Flavour: Sour

– Weather: Wind

 

  • FIRE a time brimming with flowering and brimming with energy – think

– Season – Summer

– Body part – Heart and small intestine

– Sensory organ – Tongue

– Tissue – pulse

– Fluid – Sweat

– Colour: Red

– Emotion: Joy

– Flavour: Bitter

– Weather: Heat

 

  • EARTH a time of transition as in the changing of seasons – think

– Season – none (some books late sommer)

– Body parts – Pancreas and stomach

– Sensory organ – Mouth

– Tissue – Muscles

– Fluid – Saliva

Colour: Yellow

– Emotion: Pensive

– Flavour: Sweet

– Weather: Damp

 

  • METAL a time of harvesting and collecting – think

– Season – autumn

– Body parts – Lung and large intestine

Sensory organ – Nose

– Tissue – Skin

– Fluid – Mucous

– Colour: White

– Emotion: Sadness

– Flavour: Pungent

– Weather: Dry

  • WATER a time of stillness and retreat – think

– Season – Winter

– Body parts – Kidney and bladder

– Sensory organ – Ears

– Fluid – Urine

– Tissue – bones

– Colour: Black

– Emotion: Fear

– Flavour: Salty

– Weather: Cold

 

Each element promotes, controls and is controlled by another

  • The Creative Cycle

– wood promotes fire

– fire promotes earth

– earth promotes metal

– metal promotes water

– water promotes wood

 

The Controlling or Destructive Cycle – one element can control or be controlled by another element

– water controls fire

– fire controls metal

– metal controls wood

– wood controls earth

– earth controls water

When there’s an imbalance in one element, it doesn’t stop there, the affected element may stop doing its job in controlling or promoting another element


Eg. – Wood overpowers Earth

  • Wood and its organ the liver affects our ability to regulate stress.
  • Earth and its organ the pancreas is linked to digestion.
  • People who have high stress levels often have digestion issues.
  • In Chinese medicine wood is preventing earth from doing its job aka digestion.
  • The solution – Move the stagnant Qi in the liver.

The 5 Elements Personalities

The Element Characteristics & Personalities

  • Wood types – may be firm and strong but also rigid or uptight.
  • Metal types – may be responsible and meticulous though sometimes unbending.
  • Fire types – may be boisterous and joyous but also quick to anger.
  • Earth types ­ – may be caring and giving but can also be immovable, stubborn, or overbearing.
  • Water types – may be quiet, reserved, and introspective as well as emotive and sentimental.

These are simple caricatures of the personality types. As with western astrology zodiac signs, when applied to actual people, they become much more complex and nuanced.

In reality we all have bits and pieces of each within us.

 

The 5 Element Horoscope

  • The elements are also part of the lunar year
  • 12 zodiac signs and animals that go along with them
  • Each animal represents 1 year and has unique characteristics.
  • For example
  • 2021 is the Year of the Ox an earth creature
  • 2022 is the year of the Tiger a water tiger
  • Each 12-year cycle also corresponds to an element eg. the years 2020 to 2031 are considered “metal” years.

The 5 Element Horoscope

  • The elements are also part of the lunar year
  • 12 zodiac signs and animals that go along with them
  • Each animal represents 1 year and has unique characteristics.
  • For example

– 2021 is the Year of the Ox an earth creature

– 2022 is the year of the Tiger a water tiger

  • Each 12-year cycle also corresponds to an element eg. the years 2020 to 2031 are considered “metal” years.

The Element Characteristics & Personalities

Wood types
– may be firm and strong but also rigid or uptight.

Metal types
– may be responsible and meticulous though sometimes unbending.

Fire types
– may be boisterous and joyous but also quick to anger.

Earth types ­
– may be caring and giving but can also be immovable, stubborn, or overbearing.

Water types
– may be quiet, reserved, and introspective as well as emotive and sentimental.

These are simple caricatures of the personality types. As with western astrology zodiac signs, when applied to actual people, they become much more complex and nuanced.

In reality we all have bits and pieces of each within us.

Questions? Please don't hesitate to contact me

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